Wedding Essentials: Insuring Your Engagement Ring

You’re engaged, yay! One of the first -- and frequently overlooked -- steps is to insure your engagement ring. Your fiance most likely spent quite a pretty penny on it, or maybe it’s a family heirloom. Regardless of its history, it’s extremely important that you get insurance on it as soon as possible. Why? You insure other items that are high in value: your home, your vehicle, your health… so it makes sense that this would go right along with those things, too. This way, you have a backup plan if something were to happen to your ring. Instead of losing thousands of dollars in the ocean on your honeymoon, you know you can file a claim with your insurance when you get home to recoup your losses to replace your ring. Going about acquiring your insurance for your ring can be confusing, there are lots of different options! So today, we’re going to break down all those details and help you make sense of what your options are.

Image Source: Olive Ave Jewelry

Image Source: Olive Ave Jewelry

Your Options:

There are two main avenues you can pursue for insuring your ring. The first is to add it onto your home or renters insurance as a “rider.” While home and renter insurance typically covers items within the home, it’s really only up to a certain dollar amount. That’s why it’s best to get a rider to cover your ring specifically to avoid any complications. The other option is to get an independent policy just on your ring, usually from a company that specializes in jewelry insurance. A big pro to this option is that they usually offer more comprehensive coverage than a rider would. So instead of just getting the cash, your policy may actually issue a replacement ring in the event something happens to it.

The Process:

The first step in any process is usually to have an appraisal done. Make sure that you’re having this done with a licensed gemologist. There’s usually a small fee associated with this process. It’s also good to note that you should get your ring re-appraised on a somewhat regular basis. We recommend every two to three years to make sure your insurance coverage is still the right amount. In addition to your appraisal, some companies will require your original receipt as well as a copy of your GIA certificate.

Image Source: Charla Storey

Image Source: Charla Storey

What can I expect to pay?

Typically, most policies will include a premium that is 1-2% of the ring’s value. So if you have an $8,000 ring, you can expect an $80-160 premium. That being said, rates will differ depending on the cost and quality of the piece, your location, and your level of coverage. Shop around and see what different quotes you can get with different options.

Questions to Ask:

This is the time to ask all the questions! You want to make sure you have a full understanding of your policy and exactly what is covered and what isn’t. Are there any hidden stipulations? Now is the time to dig in and really get all the answers! Some of the questions we suggest asking include:

  • Is the ring covered if you lose it accidentally, or only if it's stolen?

  • How will the company replace the ring? Are you insured for a replacement or only cash? Will they require you to purchase a replacement through a specified jeweler? What happens if a suitable replacement cannot be found?

  • What if it's a vintage ring or other unique piece? How will the quality and size of your diamond—and that of a replacement if needed—be documented?

  • Is the ring insured to full cost or a fraction of it?

  • How will you need to prove the ring vanished if you make a claim?

  • Are there any circumstances of loss or damage that aren't covered?

  • Can you choose who repairs your ring?

  • Will you continue to be insured when out of the country?

  • Are you covered for damage or just loss/theft?

  • Will the policy adjust according to inflation?

  • What maintenance is required?

  • What services go towards a deductible?

Image Source: The White Wren

Image Source: The White Wren

Remember, if there’s anything that you’re confused about, uncomfortable with, or just unsure on, now is the time to ask!

Things to Remember:

If you opt to insure your ring through a rider on your home or renters insurance, make sure you remember to move your rider with you to your next residence! This is something that can easily be overlooked and forgotten, and unfortunately you most likely won’t remember until you need it most. A lot of policies will require regular cleanings and checkups on your ring, even if your policy doesn’t, we highly recommend getting into this practice because it’s the best way to catch if something is coming loose before it’s too late!

Ring Styles

The world of engagement rings can be a very overwhelming and stressful place! Luckily, we’re here to help you navigate the in’s and out’s of rings -- including diamond shape, settings, and band materials, to help you pick that perfect ring!

image source dawes design

image source dawes design

You would be surprised at just how many different cuts there are for diamonds! The list goes on and on. However, the top 10 cuts are: round, princess, oval, marquise, pear, cushion, emerald, asscher, radiant, and heart. While each diamond is unique, each of these cuts carries the same characteristics.

This tends to be the most popular style, with 75% of all diamonds being cut round. Due to demand, this tends to be the most expensive cut. That being said, its brilliant cut leaves it with 58 facets, making it beautifully bright and reflective. This shape is very versatile in terms of what settings it will work well with. In love with the round but it’s slightly out of your budget? Try going to with a smaller stone and adding a halo, which is even smaller stones surrounding the center round cut stone.

image source: diamond studs wholesale

image source: diamond studs wholesale


image source: houston diamond district

image source: houston diamond district

The princess cut tends to be the most popular of the “fancy” shapes. A great bonus is that they tend to be slightly cheaper than the round cut, as they’re square and create less waste. This square or slightly rectangular cut also give the illusion of a larger stone than a same weight round diamond. This cut is also very versatile in what settings it works with! One thing to note about setting a princess diamond: due to its rectangular nature, it is extremely important that it is placed in a four-prong setting where each corner of the stone is protected from chipping or other damage.


An oval shape is similar to the round in that it is a modified brilliant cut, meaning it is gorgeously bright and reflective. An oval diamond is perfect for someone who likes the round cut, but wants something a little different and more unique. This cut also gives off the illusion of a larger diamond in addition to making one’s fingers to longer and more slender.

image source:  rosados box

image source:  rosados box


image source: broadway gold

image source: broadway gold

This football shaped diamond also falls in the modified brilliant cut group. Similar to the oval cut but with pointed ends, the marquise diamond also offers the benefit of making the fingers look longer and more slender. It boasts the largest crown of all cuts, therefore giving the best illusion for a larger diamond. It’s important to note that this cut must be set in a two-prong setting to protect the ends from chipping.


The pear shape is a combination of a round and marquise. It is rounded at one end and tapers to a point at the other. This has the same benefits of the marquise shape but adding a little variety. The point is always worn facing the hand on the wearer. This must be set so that a prong protects the point, as this is where the diamond would be likely to chip.

image source: diamond ring forever

image source: diamond ring forever


image source: houston diamond district

image source: houston diamond district

The cushion cut is a square cut with rounded edges, resembling a pillow or cushion. This cut used to be the most popular before the round style took its place at the top of the list. However, recently the cushion shape has been making a surging comeback and is becoming extremely popular.


This long rectangular diamond achieves its shape with “step cuts” originally created to cut emeralds, hence its name. This elegant shape differs from the brilliant cut of many of the other shapes and offers more of a “hall of mirrors” effect and more sophisticated feel.

image source: ritani

image source: ritani


image source: the knot

image source: the knot

The asscher cut reached its popularity in the 1920’s, becoming a rare find only in antique shops over the years. However, it has recently made a comeback and is gaining popularity. This diamond has a similar cut to that of the emerald shape, but instead of being rectangular, it is a square shape.


The radiant cut diamond is a combination of a princess and cushion cuts with its square to rectangular shape and its rounded corners. Its brilliant cut will shine bright in a variety of settings.

image source: diamond ring forever

image source: diamond ring forever


image source mdc diamonds

image source mdc diamonds

A clear image of love, the heart shape diamond is exactly as it sounds. This diamond is also a modified brilliant cut and will light up any room. Be aware, as smaller heart diamonds (under a half carat) are less ideal and can be difficult to really see the shape, especially after being put in a proper setting.

Picking a setting can be a daunting task. The sheer number of options is enough to make anyone’s head spin. The setting is an important decision as it may dictate which cut of diamond you will need to pick. Here are some of the most popular and common settings.

image source: james allen

image source: james allen

The prong setting is the most common and classic setting. Essentially, the diamond sits in a type of claw that holds it in place. The claw usually has either four or six prongs to secure the diamond. With four prongs, you can see more of the diamond, but with six, your diamond is less likely to shift or fall out of the setting. Overall, there is still a minimal amount of metal visible with either style, centering all attention on the stone!


image source: james allen

image source: james allen

This setting is the second most popular setting and holds a more modern feel. Instead of prongs, this setting offers a thin metal surround for the entirety of the diamond, offering it even greater protection. Additionally, a bezel setting is less likely to snag on anything like clothing, which may occur with a prong setting.


image source: adiamor

image source: adiamor

A pavé setting is one that is “paved” with tiny diamonds all around the band. The stones are placed with minimal metal between them, giving the band a constant sparkle any way you look at it. This setting highlights the main stone. Be cautious when picking a pavé setting and ensure that you have the proper ring size selected, and it’s both difficult and pricey to resize.


image source diamond wave

image source diamond wave

In a halo setting, the main stone is encircled in smaller stones. Often selected in an attempt to save some money, this setting gives the illusion of a much larger center stone. Many times, people will combine the halo setting with a pavé setting to really get a sparkle.

While there are other options out there, the most common materials for engagement and wedding bands are Gold and Platinum. Each has its pros and cons, which we’ll outline below!

image source; mazal diamond

image source; mazal diamond

When you think gold, usually you think of yellow gold… but that’s not all we’re referring to here! Included in the gold family is yellow gold, white gold, and rose gold. A classic, versatile option, gold itself is actually too soft on its own to be a band, and is therefore combined with other materials to strengthen it. The most common options you’ll find are 18K (75% gold), 14K (58% gold) and 10K (about 42% gold) gold. Yellow gold has dropped in popularity, with both white gold and now rose gold rising to the top of the charts. Durable and readily available, gold is a classy and budget friendly option for your band.

image source: blue nile

image source: blue nile

Unlike white gold, platinum is naturally a white metal. It is also a very durable and more rare option than gold. This is a great option for those who are extremely active. Additionally, platinum is hypoallergenic, so it’s a great option if someone has a metal allergy!


Picking an engagement ring is a huge decision. The key is to take your time doing your research so you can confidently make your decision! For more information on diamonds, check out our post on the 4 C’s

Winter Gathering

When creating this Winter Gathering concept, Parsimony Inspired's vision was to embrace the color palette of winter but balance the look with soft feminine accents. We created a design with hues of creams, greys and greens, a palette that we softened with flowing fabrics, gold accents and mixed textures.

Tucked in the mountains of the Berkshires, Bloom Meadows was the perfect backdrop for this romantic winter shoot. A space with beautiful lines, natural elements and neutral colors, our designs felt rooted in the space and allowed our soft color palette to pop against the beautiful white walls. We loved the venue's design so much we had our invitation designer Kim Small of With Wild and Grace draw the venue and add it to the elegant invitation suite's design. One of our favorite ways to add a custom detail. 

Our bride was styled in a stunning chiffon A-line Lilian West gown. The illusion V-neck and the detail of the lace appliqués also brought a feminine touch to the bridal look, while the long sleeves and chapel length train were the perfect look for a winter wedding. The hair style framed our bride's face with greenery touches while soft makeup with a smokey eye gave a bit of drama to the final look. To add a little sparkle to our bride's style, she wore a stunning engagement ring and wedding band set designed by Megan Thorne and stunning hand crafted moonstone earrings designed by Pamela Froman.

When it came to working with floral designer Stacey Radcliffe of The Tangled Grapevine, we knew that we wanted the flowers to be filled with different types of greenery, our favorite trend for 2017. We incorporated greenery in every aspect of the design from the aerial floral installation above our reception table to greenery in our bride's hair. Stacey created a lush presentation bouquet filled with white Anemone, silver Brunia, white Lisianthus, peach Spray Roses, white Tulips, seeded Eucalyptus, Ruscus, Asparagus Fern and Gooseneck Loosestrifes.

From the serene Berkshire winter setting, the soft and romantic invitation suite with it's perfect vellum wax seal to the amazing marbled cakedesigned by the talented Pete of Pete's Sweets, we balanced winter's neutral palette and elements of nature with soft fabrics, feminine touches and meaningful details that would make you want to spend a winter's eve snuggled up with the one you love.

Photography: Brooke Ellen Photography & Alison Marie Photography | Planning & Design: Parsimony Inspired | Flowers: The Tangled Grapevine | Invitations & Stationery: With Wild and Grace | Cake: Pete’s Sweets | Dress: Lillian West from In White | Makeup: KiSSandMaKeUp | Jewellery: Don Muller Gallery | Videography: Embark Films | Venue: Bloom Meadows

The Minimalist Story

We were inspired by the gardens and architecture of this late 1800's historical home nestled next to the Emily Dickinson homestead in the heart of Amherst, Massachusetts. The house and surrounding grounds helped us create a space where we could incorporate the unique elements of softness, texture and romance.

Our vision for this seasonal shoot was to embrace a balance of nature's elegance and feminine romance. We created a soft design with hues of creams, greys and blues, a palette that softened our base of earth textures; wood, succulents and ivy.

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While touring the grounds we decided to set our table beneath the canopy of a gorgeous old tree, whose low hanging branches created a stunning backdrop. Our table was a mix of wood, bark and succulents softened by accents of gold and sweeping fabric. It was the type of setting would make any guest linger in their seat to absorb the surroundings and details.

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Our bride was styled in a beautiful lace BHLDN gown and elegant accessories. Her hair was simply done and her soft makeup with a hint of pink lip was all this bride needed to allow her stunning lace dress to take center stage.

The setting was dreamy, and perfect for a lush, cascading bouquet filled with Dogwood, roses, peonies, the first sight of dahlias and on-site greenery designed by Flowers by Justine.

From the elegant invitation with its perfect velvet envelope, the earth inspired cake with its handmade details of succulents and grapevine, to the beautiful balance of nature and romance, the new Minimalist Bride is defined.

Event Design: Parsimony Vintage | Photography: Melanie Zacek | Fine Art Photography | Model: Maya Simone | Succulent Favors: AudandEl | Table Number: Everlaser | Floral Design: Flowers By Justine | Hair and Makeup: Michelle Anne Hair Design | Wedding Veil and Hairpeice: Bridal Heirlooms | Wedding Dress: BHLDN | Rentals: Jerome's Party Plus | Cake: Pete's Sweets  | Jewelry : DMG Gallery  | Ring Box: OaknShield | Invitations: With Wild and Grace | Wedding Venue: Amherst Women's Club

National Jewel Day: The Four C's

It’s time to celebrate all things shiny and sparky today for National Jewel Day! What better way to celebrate a girl’s best friend than by focusing on our favorite piece of jewelry: the engagement ring. Before picking out your dream ring, it’s important to know the Four C’s: Cut, Color, Clarity, and Carat. 

The cut of a diamond is the most important characteristic, since it determines the sparkle of the diamond. The better the cut grade of a diamond, the more sparkle it will have. 


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The color of a diamond is the second most important characteristic. The higher the grade, the most expensive the ring will be. To avoid breaking the bank, choosing a near-colorless diamond will save you money all while appearing to be colorless to the naked eye. 


The clarity of a diamond refers to very tiny imperfections (also called inclusions). The higher the grade, the fewer and smaller inclusions there are. To maximize your budget, choose a diamond that is “eye-clean,” which means there are no visible inclusions to the naked eye.


The carat of a diamond refers to the weight of the diamond. In relation to a diamond’s cut, the smaller carat weight of a diamond appears larger with a higher cut grade. The larger the carat, the rarer the diamond will be.